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Fraudscape 2018

Cifas member organisations recorded 305,564 instances of fraudulent conduct on our databases in 2017.

Our Insight team, led by Sandra Peaston, has analysed that data to gain a comprehensive picture of the current fraud landscape in the UK. The resulting annual report, Fraudscape, is the only publication of its kind that provides analysis of the UK’s internal and external fraud trends.

Fraudscape provides fraud and financial crime professionals, law enforcement, journalists, and HR professionals with an accurate summary of fraud risk and fraudulent attempts made in the UK.

Key findings in this year’s Fraudscape include:

To create the report, the Insight team analyse data recorded by Cifas member organisations to the National Fraud Database and the Internal Fraud Database to identify the key changes in fraud behaviour. They combine this analysis with intelligence provided by our members, to gain an understanding of the methods and motives for fraudulent conduct.

Collaborating in the fight against fraud 

We work in partnership with organisations from the private and public sectors, and police and law enforcement, on a wide range of projects and initiatives. This includes campaigns to raise awareness about the issues highlighted in the Fraudscape report – identity fraud and money mule activity.

In 2016 we worked with partners and our members on the hugely successful Data to Go film, raising awareness of the amount of personal information people unwittingly share online making them prime targets for identity fraud.

Last year, we worked with FFA UK on raising awareness about money mule activity, with our film Sponsor a Child Trafficker looking at the often disturbing crimes this type of fraud facilitates.

In response to increasing numbers of young people affected by fraud, we have worked with the PSHE Association on anti-fraud lesson plans, targeted at 11-16-year-olds. The lessons give young people a better understanding of the consequences of fraudulent activity and what to look out for to avoid becoming a victim.

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